Yesterday, Labour selected Poto Williams to be the candidate for Christchurch East. It was a robust, inclusive and open process, with a group of great candidates. Hacks in the room like myself genuinely had no idea who’s name was going to be called. That hasn’t stopped people who only have the best interests of the Labour Party at heart, like David Farrar, having a little tanty about it:

I’m disappointed but not surprised James Caygill missed out. No one who knows Caygill doubts that if he became an MP, he would be a very good one and inevitably become a senior Minister. Caygill has now missed out twice on Labour selections.

David, if you believe anything you say about Caygill, then the best thing you could do is to stop endorsing him for anything. I know James well, and agree that he would do a great job in parliament – but his biggest issue within the party is his name. Being endorsed by the National Party’s chief cheerleader isn’t going to do him any good. You know what they say – if you love someone, let them go.

As for trying to discredit Poto Williams by stalking her on LinkedIn – I’d think twice about criticising someone for not being local when your guy has been living in the UK for some time. Did I miss the bit where you attacked Caygill for not living in the electorate, or was that just some more self-serving hypocrisy on your part?

Finally, to have him try lecture us on how undemocratic our selection processes are is an absolute farce. Bro, you’re a part of the National Party, where the party list is drawn up based on who can drink the most Moet in 24 hours for all I know. Matthew Doocey was some guy that no-one had ever heard of that got plucked out of thin air. Christchurch East ran a series of public meetings with the candidates, then had an extremely well-attended selection meeting. It was a robust process that selected the best candidate for the position, and National could do worse than modeling their selections on it – that way, they could have avoided someone like Aaron Gilmore being chosen.

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